What is Milton-Freewater Public Library doing for teens? By Rhina Barahona

Milton-FreewaterLibrary

Milton-Freewater Public Library has just started a new monthly teen craft night. The craft night consists of doing activities such as painting, jewelry making and many other fun projects. The teens are able to let loose and use their creativity to make something of their own while having a good time with other teens and making new friends.

The teens responded very positively. They were excited that finally there was something for teens to do and they really liked the projects that I had suggested. The parents were very excited as well to see their teens wanting to come to the library for this event.

Before starting a teen program you should:

  • Build relationships with the older kids that come to the library.
  • As for their opinions about what they would like to see done.
  • Ask them questions to make them feel like they are contributing to the program.
  • When you start the program advertise it throughout the library and online. Remind older kids that are checking out books about the new program and let them know what it’s about.

Written by Rhina Barahona

 

Milton-Freewater Public Library’s 2016-2017 statistics from the State Library of Oregon:

  • County: Umatilla
  • Population: 9,872
  • Registered borrowers: 4,033
  • Total library visits: 30,000
  • Total library hours in a typical week: 48
  • Total paid staff: 3.96

Learn more about Milton-Freewater Public Library via their website and facebook page.

Want to share what your library is doing for teens? Contact Katie Anderson.

F*Ups and Outreach: A Day in the Life of a Teen Services Librarian

This post is by Kristy Kemper Hodge, Teen Services Librarian at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library. Want more f*ups or to share your own? Join us at OLA for Many Points of Failure: One Big F*%!up.

You know that moment: You’re at an outreach site, setting up for some totally rad, yet totally-new-to-you activity, and you realize you forgot a key supply!

This moment came when I was unpacking materials and setting up my station for creating lava lamps at Cheldelin Middle School earlier this month as a pop-up maker event I was leading in the school library. I had totally forgotten the key ingredient: food coloring! How could we make colorless lava lamps? Who had even heard of such a thing?

And yet … that was not the f*up of the day. While the school librarian phoned the cafeteria, asking about food coloring, she missed by triumphant, “HUZZAH! It was here all along!” that I shouted across the school library. In between classes, of course.

No. The real f*up came right as I was leading a library full of eager, wide-eyed, and excited middle schoolers through the very first step of creating their own lava lamp. Continue reading