OYAN Review: 90 Seconds of Fame

This post is an article from the Spring 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Sonja Somerville at the Salem Public Library.

A momentary hush fell over the room as the screen sprang to life. It was a big moment for seven members of the Salem Public Library Teen Advisory Board — a moment months in the making. They were about to see all 90 seconds of their creative retelling of Ella Enchanted by Gail Carson Levine on the big screen, during the official screening of the annual 90-Second Newbery Film Festival.

They were ready, and perhaps a bit sheepish, as the audience met their Ella (played by an eggplant with glued-on googly eyes) and Prince Charmant (a poblano pepper with with glued-on googly eyes). But as it turns out, this madcap creative effort was a good fit for the 90-Second Newbery Film Festival, an annual project organized by James Kennedy, author of The Order of Odd-Fish.

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OYAN Review: Aha! Moments

This post is an article from the Spring 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Julie Jenmard at the Cottage Grove Public Library.

I recently had a series of “Aha Moments” in regard to my life as a youth services librarian. It all started during the week of the OLA conference. I knew TLAB had a huge program the following week on Friday: a teen art show. Last year it was highly successful, but I was not yet at the Cottage Grove Public Library for the program. As of the start of the OLA conference, I had two art submissions; last year the two gallery walls were filled. Thus starts my panic. I heard rumors that the teens tend to wait until the last minute to turn in art, which was true as of the deadline; however, one week before the show this fact did not assuage my fear that the art show that teens had worked so hard and long putting together would be a flop. I personally wanted it bigger and better and not to fail under my guidance. So, I made a back up plan that turned out better than expected. I contacted the high school art teacher to see if I could go to her class to procure art. She responded quickly and invited me to all five of her art class periods. Tuesday did bring in about ten art pieces. Even still, those few pieces would not have had the gallery brimming with art.

The day of the visit rolls around, I have a bell schedule in my hand and I venture to the local high school for my first ever class visit as a youth services librarian. Aha moment number one: I am not nervous around a large group of teens. I have never had the opportunity to be around so many teenagers at once. Instead of feeling any ounce of trepidation, I felt my introverted self more energetic around their presence.

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F*Ups and Outreach: A Day in the Life of a Teen Services Librarian

This post is by Kristy Kemper Hodge, Teen Services Librarian at the Corvallis-Benton County Public Library. Want more f*ups or to share your own? Join us at OLA for Many Points of Failure: One Big F*%!up.

You know that moment: You’re at an outreach site, setting up for some totally rad, yet totally-new-to-you activity, and you realize you forgot a key supply!

This moment came when I was unpacking materials and setting up my station for creating lava lamps at Cheldelin Middle School earlier this month as a pop-up maker event I was leading in the school library. I had totally forgotten the key ingredient: food coloring! How could we make colorless lava lamps? Who had even heard of such a thing?

And yet … that was not the f*up of the day. While the school librarian phoned the cafeteria, asking about food coloring, she missed by triumphant, “HUZZAH! It was here all along!” that I shouted across the school library. In between classes, of course.

No. The real f*up came right as I was leading a library full of eager, wide-eyed, and excited middle schoolers through the very first step of creating their own lava lamp. Continue reading

OYAN Review: Teen Mystery Program

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Marian Rose at the Seaside Public Library.

I consider myself lucky that my library is right across the street from our district middle school. The teen events are held after school on Tuesdays for one hour (unofficially an hour and a half). Although it’s easy access for teens to attend after school, keeping it interesting and fun (while introducing what the library has to offer) to keep them coming back and wanting more can be a challenge.

When I scheduled a murder mystery in the library I had no idea where to start. Continue reading

OYAN Review: Are You Ready for Eclipse 2017?

This post is an article from the Summer 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Keli Yeats of the Multnomah County Library.

A photograph of a partial solar eclipseAs you may have heard, “The Great American Eclipse” is coming on Monday, August 21st, and parts of Oregon are on the path of totality (Here’s a list of communities that will be able to see the full eclipse). Other areas should be able to see a partial or near total eclipse.

While you are preparing for traffic and tourists, many of your are planning programs as well. Fortunately there are a lot of resources to help you with your program.

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The Teens of Salem Public Library Win the Summer Reading Video Contest

Congratulations to Salem Public Library’s Teen Advisory Board and Teen Librarian Sonja Somerville for winning the 2016 teen summer reading video challenge! Watch their winning video online now.

The Collaborative Summer Library Program’s (CSLP) Teen Video Challenge is a national competition for teens to get involved with reading and their public library’s summer reading program.  Winning videos were selected at the state level to be recognized as an official CSLP Teen Video Challenge winner for 2016. For their hard work and creativity, each winner for this year’s competition received a monetary award of $150 and the awards can be used as each winner sees fit. You can watch the winning videos from other states on the CSLP website.

You may use any of these videos to promote your own summer reading program!They are great for posting on your website and social media.

If you think teens at your library might want to participate in CSLP’s Teen Video Challenge, start planting the idea in their heads now so they’re motivated to create their own video for the 2017 teen summer reading video challenge. The 2017 summer reading theme and slogan will be Build A Better World. Information about participating in the 2017 Teen Video Challenge will be sent out next winter.