Community College

CoverOfSpring2019CommunityCollegeIssue

Earlier this year, I wrote about nontraditional and vocational post-high school options. The Spring 2019 edition of the office journal of the Young Adult Library Services Association is the community college issues.

While are several good articles worth reading I want to discuss “Next Steps: Preparing Teens for Growth and Success at Community College” by Camila Jenkin, (pages 19-4). This article provides a few idea about how teen librarians and high school librarians might support older high school students transition to community college specifically. However, a lot of the suggestions are relevant to any type of college or university experience and some are also relevant to teens who go to trade school or enter the workforce after high school.

  • Talk with teen about who and how to ask for help, providing real life examples.
  • Invite current college students to be on a panel to discuss their college experience; be sure to include more than one first-generation student.
  • Talk with teen about how they find information, including the Internet and Library of Congress classification system.
  • Foster growth mindset thinking. “Many teens have been socialized to believe that they bring nothing of value.” Help them realize the valuable experiences and skills that they bring any college class… or trade school or job.
  • Encourage teens to join a club, study group, or similar soon after they start college—it can be more difficult for community college students to develop a social/support network at college and feel part of college life.
  • Learn about the options your local community college provides to students for getting text books—they are very expensive—and share that information with teens. They need to know their options before they start school, including Fair Use copyright, so they know what to do the first week off college when they don’t have their books yet.

OYAN Review: 2019 Spring

In this issues, learn about…
  • Goblins in the Library! (Salem Public Library)
  • Congratulations to OYEA Winner Danielle Jones
  • Deschutes Public Library’s Youth Lit Fest
  • 2019 Book Rave Titles Announced
  • Why Alex Gino Is Just the Best (Multnomah County Library’s Rockwood Branch)
  • And more!
Thank you so much to everyone who contributed an article — it’s really fun to get to share your accomplishments and experiences!

Winter 2019 OYAN Review and More SEL!

OYANReview

The Winter 2019 OYAN Review is now available! It includes great program ideas, the 2019 Mock Printz results, professional learning about leadership, behavior management, and more. Two articles offer good examples of social emotional learning (SEL).

SEL includes establishing and maintaining positive relationships, and feeling empathy for others. Putting devices away, looking into the faces of other people, and trying to read their feelings are important for this aspect of social emotional learning. Read “Teen Poker Games” by Marian Rose, Seaside Public Library, to learn about a program that provides teens this SEL opportunity.

SEL also includes understanding and managing one’s own emotions and making responsible decisions. Providing teens and staff a forum to share their feelings about past conflicts, think about the needs of other kinds of patrons, and brainstorm ideas of what behavior looks like in the library if everyone’s needs are met helps teens develop these SEL skills. Read “Restorative Practices at Hillsboro Public Library” by Emily Smith to learn more about how to turn behavior management into an SEL opportunity—that effectively improves behavior too!

Leadership and Teen Services

Many libraries promote teen services, especially Teen Advisory Council positions, as leadership opportunities—great for college applications! Participating teens provide input on program planning, teen spaces, collection development, and more. In some cases, they make decisions about programming and marketing, and are responsible for much of the implementation. These are great leadership experiences for teens. However, we rarely talk about the leadership skill the librarians need to successfully organize and facilitate this work with teens.

Mark Richardson, in his article Stepping Up: Applying Situational Leadership Concepts to Public Library Work With Teens, describes how librarians can use Situational Leadership to implement effective teen leadership opportunities. Situational Leadership includes four styles of leadership: directing, coaching, supporting, and delegating. Effective leaders utilize all four styles, and know when to use which style depending on the task or situation.

As you read the following description of each style, think about when you might use that style with teens and why. What you might do to implement each style? What do you hope teens gain from experiencing each style as you implement it?

  • “Directing, is used whenever one trains a new person or teaches a new skill.”
  • “Coaching… is still directive, but more time is given to explaining our goals and why we have them. Input is requested and integrated into plans when possible.”
  • “Supporting… [is] trying to get the teens to make decisions on their own without as much help.”
  • When “delegating, people are empowered to act independently with less input from the leader.”

Read Stepping Up: Applying Situational Leadership Concepts to Public Library Work With Teens for more information about Situational Leadership and examples of how Mark has and plans to apply Situational Leadership to teen services at Cedar Mill Community Library.

Career Programming

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More and more libraries are implementing programs that support teens transitioning from high school to college, careers, and independent living. You have probably heard about or even implemented adulting 101 programs, college test prep classes, and volunteer programs designed more like jobs for which teens have to apply and interview. Have you considered focusing on nontraditional and vocational (trade school) alternatives?

Four year colleges and universities are too expensive for many teens and increasingly competitive to get into. Fewer people are going into trades that require mid-level skills while opportunities in these fields are growing. Many of these careers pay better than those only require a high school diploma, and some of them pay really well.

You can learn more about these trends and relevant library program ideas in Career Programming for Today’s Teens: Exploring Nontraditional and Vocational Alternatives by Amy Wyckoff and Marie Harris. To get you started, I recommend the following online resources:

What is Beaverton City Library doing for teens? By Ian Duncanson

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Beaverton City Library is currently looking into the possibility of putting together a spring Teen Job Fair in conjunction with Worksource Oregon and a representative from the Oregon State University Extension Service. We last offered job fairs for teens around 2009 and 2010 and have been eager to bring them back for a number of years. I’m aiming to structure the fair like our big annual Family Resource Fair with potential employers tabling rather than community organizations.

We had a fantastic response when we did this program in the past. We have had requests for this off and on. We have had good luck with other college and job prep events for teens and are hoping for the same with this event.

[Here are some tips for other libraries who want to try a Teen Job Fair]

  1. A community partner (or partners) is essential, especially when it comes to contacting potential employers who might want to table at your event.
  2. Start planning EARLY, 5-6 months in advance and before you do any advertising or announcements.
  3. Create a streamlined application form that potential employers will fill out to apply for a table. This will help make the even seem more official and cement commitments to participate more than simple email or oral community will. I am happy to share a draft of the form we’re using if you would like to adapt it.
  4. Create a small brochure/map of the room for attendees showing them where all of the tables are.

[In the past, attendance has been] pretty good, but we could always do better! As I mentioned before, we have had good luck with college prep and practice tests. All of the summer and spring break programs have our best attendance. During the school year I focus on my Teen Library Council and events with them, two writing contests (we generally get 150-250 entries for these), and our big annual Teen Art Show which draws between 500 and 700.

Getting the word out is always a challenge, as is keeping up with fast-moving trends and devising new programs that will draw a crown. I’m fortunate to be at a library that is so supportive of services for teens!

Written by Ian Duncanson

 

Beaverton City Library’s 2016-2017 statistics from the State Library of Oregon:

  • County: Washington
  • Population: 141,671
  • Registered borrowers: 63,722
  • Total library visits: 821,233
  • Total library hours in a typical week: 63
  • Total paid staff: 68.35

Learn more about Beaverton City Library via their website and facebook page.

Want to share what your library is doing for teens? Contact Katie Anderson.

 

 

What is Klamath County Library doing for teens? By Stephanie Goodwin

In recent years, the Klamath County Library has struggled with getting teens involved.  It’s not unusual for us to get 20 or more teens in the library after school, but they are not interested in taking part in any activity we plan even when it’s something they suggest we do.  About 2 years ago I read about the Breakout EDU escape the room kit and thought this would be a fun addition to our library so ordered one.  It didn’t take long for my staff to begin writing their own mysteries and doing special after hours dinner for our teens.  The teens have to pre-register and we limit our participation to 10-15 teens.  They are encouraged to dress up either as a specific character, in a certain time period, or just in their fanciest.  For those who don’t come dressed up we have a box of random items they can use.  Our mysteries have been everything from vampires, to Dr. Diabolical infecting the world, and everything in between.

We have had a great response to this program from our teens.  Often they request we do it every Friday night instead of the monthly/bimonthly schedule we are currently following.  Some of our teens are very creative and come dressed up and others just come for the pizza.  In the end, they are learning how to work in a team (often unsuccessfully), use the library, and tune their critical thinking skills.

A few things we have learned from doing these programs is

  1. A smaller group is better
  2. Have 1 library staff member who is a lifeline to help teens solve the puzzles. Typically teens can ask 3 questions.
  3. Teens do not always catch on as fast as we think they should. The first few we did were way too hard.  We have had to make the puzzles easier.

Written by Stephanie Goodwin

 

Klamath County Library’s 2016-2017 statistics from the State Library of Oregon:

  • County: Klamath
  • Population: 67,410
  • Registered borrowers: 38,617
  • Total library visits: 315,231
  • Total library hours in a typical week: 52
  • Total paid staff: 33.36

Learn more about Klamath County Library via their website and facebook page.

Want to share what your library is doing for teens? Contact Katie Anderson.