Social Emotional Learning

YALSA

Young Adult Library Services Winter 2019 focuses on social emotional learning (SEL) and has several great articles. If you aren’t as familiar with SEL, “Reading Between the Lines of Social and Emotional Learning,” by Jessica Newman and Deborah Moroney, is the a good place to start (pages 16-21).

“5 Ways to Incorporate SEL at Your Library: Supporting Multi-dimensional Learning,” by Kathleen Houlihan (pages 22-25), provides some practical suggestions–most are free/low-cost and relatively easy to implement. Additionally, two of the five ways to incorporate SEL align with the research on effective communication about teen services discussed on this blog last month.

  1. Describe program outcomes to adults using SEL
    • Adult stakeholders need to understand the value of your program in terms of teen development, including social emotional development.
    • A handy chart connecting library programs to SEL facets is included in the article.
  2. Describe program outcomes to teens using SEL
    • Idea: Create and distribute certificates for teen who complete programs at your library that list the skills they learned.
    • Telling teens explicitly what they learn helps them identify and communicate their strengths and skills.
    • It also “empowers teens to explain the value of their participation in activities to parents who may see it as just something ‘fun’ to do.”
  3. Talk about failure (yours, not theirs)
    • “If you’ve been reading the news lately, you’ll know that youth in the United States have a serious lack of confidence in their abilities.”
    • Teens need adults to talk about their own failures and model failure–what happened when we failed, what did we do about it, how did we feel about it, and what did we learn.
  4. Why you are awesome
    • Give kids specific compliments to help them identify their strengths.
    • No: You’re awesome.
    • Yes: Wow, you’re tenacious! You stuck with the activity, trying several different approaches until you found one that worked.
  5. Create space for teen leaders at your library
    • Teen Library Council
    • Teen volunteer programs

YALSA opportunities: Summer Funding, Selected Booklists

The logo of YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services AssociationApply Now for the 2019 Summer Learning Grants!
Eligible YALSA members can now apply for the Summer Learning Resources Grant and the Teen Summer Intern Program Grant. Both grants are worth $1,000 each and are generously funded by the Dollar General Literacy Foundation. Twenty-five recipients will be selected for each grant. Apply by January 1, 2019.

Be on a Selected Booklist Blogging Team!
Are you interested in serving on a selected list blogging team in 2019? If so, please fill out this form by September 30, and indicate if you are interested in Quick Picks, Great Graphic Novels, Amazing Audiobooks, and/or Best Fiction for Young Adults. If you have questions, please contact Stephen Ashley, Hub Member Manager.

YALSA’s Teens’ Top Ten: Vote and Apply to Be a Reading Group!

Did you see that YALSA’s 2018 Teens’ Top Ten shortlist was announced?

Voting is open through Teen Read Week (October 7-13), so have your teens vote on their favorites soon!

And if your teens really love to read, apply before October 1st to be a reading group for the list! Fifteen groups will be selected from the applicants to fulfill a 2 year term, which begins in January of 2019 through December 31, 2020. Curious about what the experience is like? Read more about Salem Public Library’s participation in the Teens’ Top Ten.

Slides for OLA 2018 Sessions Now Available

Whether or not you were able to join us in Eugene for OLA, you can now view the slides for most presentations on Northwest Central. Of particular interest to OYAN members:

Mark your calendars: the 2019 OLA-WLA Conference will be held at the Hilton Vancouver in Vancouver, WA from April 17-20, 2019!

2018 Teens’ Top Ten nominees announced — plus a giveaway

the logo for YALSA's Teens' Top TenYALSA has officially announced the 2018 Teens’ Top Ten Nominees — and they’ll be giving away sets of the nominees!

The Teens’ Top Ten is a “teen choice” list, where teens nominate and choose their favorite books of the previous year. Nominators are members of teen book groups in sixteen school and public libraries around the country selected by YALSA to participate (including the Salem Public Library!).

This year’s list of nominees features 25 titles that were published between January 1, 2017 and December 31, 2017. The nominees are: Continue reading

Youth Media Awards 2018!

The American Library Association’s Youth Media Awards were announced this morning! Here are the YA winners:

Michael L. Printz Award for the best book written for teens, based entirely on its literary merit, each year

  • Winner: We Are Okay by Nina LaCour
  • Honor: Long Way Down by Jason Reynolds
  • Honor: Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor
  • Honor: The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas (the OYAN Mock Printz winner!)
  • Honor: Vincent and Theo: The Van Gogh Brothers by Deborah Heiligman

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults for the best nonfiction book published for young adults (ages 12-18) during a November 1 – October 31 publishing year.
Continue reading

Finding Funding: YALSA Summer Learning Grants

Golden dollar bill signs hang from fishing line, dark shadows cast behind themIt can be tough to find funding for all of the great ideas you want to make happen at your library. In this occasional series, we’ll highlight different funding sources you may not know about or may not know how to tap.

Are you looking to take your summer learning program to the next level? YALSA is giving away twenty $1,000 grants to support libraries’ efforts to reach underserved teens over the summer months as well as another twenty $1,000 grants to support hiring teen interns over the summer.

To determine if you are eligible, you must answer yes to the following questions:

  • Is your summer learning program administered through a library?
  • Is your program open to all teens in the community?
  • Do you work directly with teens?
  • Are you a personal member of YALSA?
  • Is your library within 20 miles of a Dollar General store?

If you answered yes to all of those questions, read these tips for writing effective grants and then check out the Teen Read Week website for more details and the application forms! Applications are due by December 1st. Good luck!