Combatting Hate via Your Library

The logo of YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services AssociationYALSA has resources to help you support teens, especially those who may be feeling the brunt of current events. YALSA also has resources to help you promote empathy and understanding among teens. Check out these wiki pages:

Don’t forget that anyone can add content to these pages, so if you know of a good resource, please add it!

YALSA news: funding for middle school college & career prep, YA Services Symposium, grants for computer science programs

YALSA is offering some exciting opportunities (including funding!). See below for details!

The logo of YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services AssociationFunding & CE Opportunity for Rural, Small & Tribal Library Staff
Now through September 1st, small, rural, and tribal library staff can apply to be a part of a cohort of learners and do-ers who will create college and career readiness (CCR) services for the middle schoolers in their community. Successful applicants will receive a wide variety of support, including access to mentors, a stipend to purchase CCR materials, and funds to travel to Denver, CO, from February 8th to 9th for orientation, as well as to another conference of their choice. Cohort members will work online throughout 2018 to develop, implement, and evaluate a CCR service with a partner in their community.

Get New Ideas & Inspirations!
Registration is open for the YA Services Symposium this November 3rd through 5th in Louisville, KY. The theme is “empowering teens to increase your library’s impact.” Anyone interested in attending is welcome to come to this event. Learn more, register, and view the preliminary program!

Give a Little, Get a Lot
Everyone is welcome to join YALSA/ALA, and membership starts at $61 per year and entitles you to all kinds of great benefits, such as free live monthly webinars and a link to the recordings (a $760 value). You’ll also be connected to 4,800+ fabulous library staff across the country who share the same interests and challenges as you! Your dues support YALSA’s advocacy efforts, including our work with ALA and Congressional staff to boost library funding nationwide. Learn more or join. Questions? Contact Letitia Smith at lsmith@ala.org or 312.280.4390. She’s happy to help!

Grants to Support Computer Science Programs
ALA has announced a competitive grant program, sponsored by Google, that will fund a cohort of 25-50 school and public libraries to design computational thinking and computer science programs for and with youth, including underrepresented youth. ALA will award between 25 and 50 grants worth between $5,000 and $25,000 each. Apply now!

Oregon Librarian Danielle Jones Wins YALSA Writing Award!

The logo for YALSA's YA collections blog, The HubCongratulations to Danielle Jones at the Multnomah County Library’s Hollywood Library for winning YALSA’s 2017 Writing Award for her blog post on The Hub, “Racial and Social Justice Podcasts for Teens.” In the post, which was published in August, she curates a list of “current podcasts, podcasts that have teen appeal, that we can all be listening to that explore racial and social justice in the United States, and especially during a time where politics are front and center.”

Danielle’s excellent work earned her prize money as well as a plaque and recognition at YALSA’s Membership Meeting at ALA Annual this coming June. Be sure to congratulate her next time you see her!

2015 YA Lit Symposium Call for Proposals

by Greogry Lum, Jesuit High School

The Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), is seeking program proposals and paper presentations for its 2015 Young Adult Services Symposium, Bringing it All Together: Connecting Libraries, Teens & Communities, to be held Nov. 6-8, 2015, in Portland, Ore.

The Symposium will gather together librarians, educators, researchers, young adult authors and other teen advocates to discuss the role of libraries in connecting teens to their community and beyond. Today’s 21st century teens have unique needs and face significant challenges that they cannot deal with successfully on their own. Library staff are uniquely positioned to help teens by not only connecting them to resources in the library and their hometown, but also to resources from affinity communities that thrive online. How can library staff connect with partners, provide programming, enhance collections, and help teens build both print and digital literacy skills so that they can be successful in the future? How can library staff connect with colleagues to form personal learning networks, increase impact and tell their stories? Join YALSA as we explore how to connect teens to their community and beyond.

Now held annually, the Symposium has also expanded its focus. Programs will cover the entire spectrum of topics related to providing services for and with young adults, including readers’ advisory and maintaining young adult literature collections. YALSA is seeking proposals in the following categories:

  • Programming
  • Collections
  • Digital and Print Literacy
  • Youth Participation
  • Spaces (physical and virtual)
  • Partnering/Collaborations

YALSA invites interested parties to propose 90-minute programs centering on the theme, as well as paper presentations offering new, unpublished research relating to the theme. Applications for all proposals can be foundhttp://www.ala.org/yalsa/yasymposium . Proposals for programs and paper presentations must be completed online by Dec. 1, 2014. Applicants will be notified of their proposals’ status by Feb. 1, 2015.

What I learned at ALA: Part 4 – The Digital Lives of Tweens and Teens

This year’s President’s program was a joint effort between YALSA and ALSC focused on youth, ages 10-14 years.  The program had two presenters: Drs. Michelle Poris and Stephen Abram, VP of Gale Cengage Learning.  Dr. Poris is the owner/director of Smarty Pants, a marketing research firm specializing in youth and families.  Dr. Abrams is a futurist – one of those guys that reads like crazy and thinks about what the future will look like.

Ms. Poris started with the program with a look at the developmental processes of this age group.  And for this presentation she conducted a representational study of 415 10-14 year olds.  Some stats presented later in this post.

The key things I learned were:

  • Hey! Guess what!  Puberty drives many of the interests and behaviors of tweens!
  • All the messages about obesity being bad may be creating more body image issues.
  • The growth towards abstract thinking not only lets them think big thoughts, but they develop a more sophisticated sense of humor…as in irony, sarcasm, and puns.
  • These kids are MORE connected to parents than previous generations – cell phones make it easier to stay in contact and more kids consider their parents to be their friends.  However, all the extra curricular activities get in the way of spending time together.
  • At the same time, parents are often OVER-involved in their child’s life.  They may need “permission” to develop social connections outside of the family.  Luckily, new technology makes that easier than ever.
  • School performance has become a big issue with increasingly higher rates of anxiety, depression and etc.

Now, about technology…

  • TV is still on top, followed by music, online, video games, movies, outdoor activities, and reading for the 1o year olds.  By age 13-14 TV is still the most used technology, but texting is #4 and books have moved to the bottom of the list.
  • Tweens are multi-tasking to the max.
  • Top 50 brands for tweens include 15 digital brands with Wii and IPod touch in the lead.
  • Reality TV is the favorite type of show.
  • Games, Facebook, and being outdoors are favorite activities.
  • With all the gadgets, this age group has never had to wait to look things up.  It’s right at their fingertips.
  • Only 63% of the surveyed tweens counted books as an important way to keep up to date.  76% would rather watch a movie  BUT 75% say “I learn things from books that are just as important as the things I learn in school.”

And finally, if you want to keep up with trends, two free newsletters are YPulse and kidscreen.

On to the future…Dr. Abram says we’re in a Renaissance!

  • Children’s brains have changed – IQ’s are up 10-15 points.
  • TV and video games have changed the mapping of the brain.
  • Text-based learning is now in the minority.  Digital media contribute more; Google for text, YouTube for video, and itunes for auditory learning.
  • Video games lay the scaffold for learning and teachers should follow this method of building on success.  Fun fact: surgeons who play videogames have 30% higher success rates.

The world in 2020…

  • By 2014 many devices will be gone (CDs, DVDs, etc.) and the world will rely on wireless data streams;
  • Gesture computing will be on the rise (think Kennect);
  • More teens rely on Jon Stewart and Steven Cobert for their news than newspapers or other news programs.
  • The urban/rural divide continues but the digital divide is disappearing due to smartphones.
  • People will engage with and play primarily in the virtual world.
  • We’ll have multiple careers, many of which haven’t been identified yet.

Bottom-line…

It behooves us to get comfortable with Google+, Skype, video games, etc., and think about connecting with our patrons in the virtual world as well as in the bricks and mortar.  And that is especially true for connecting with tweens.

That’s it from ALA.

Susan