Train the Trainers Opportunity: Transforming Teen Services

The State Library of Oregon is participating in YALSA’s Transforming Teen Services: A Train the Trainer Approach project and is recruiting two teen librarians to participate!

The selected teen librarians would participate in a 2.5 day face-to-face train the trainers with teen librarians from across the country. “Participants also have the opportunity to be leaders in the field and become the go-to people in their state and nationally.  Participation also provides opportunities to speak at local, regional, and national conferences and publish articles and blog posts about connected learning, computational thinking, and library youth services.”

Contact Greta Berquist (503-378-2528, greta.berquist@state.or.us) by May 1, 2019, if you have any questions and are interested in participating.

More information:

The State Library of Oregon’s Transforming Teen Services flyer

YALSA’s Train the Trainer webpage

ALA’s press release from 09/11/2018

ALA’s press release from 04/24/2018

 

2019 LGBTQIAP Booklists

The Teen Council at Multnomah County Library’s Hollywood Branch updated their LGBTQIAP booklists. These lists are created by teens and for teens, with one list for tweens.

Lesbian Characters in YA Books

Gay Characters YA Books

Bisexual Characters in YA Books

Transgender, Non-binary, and Genderqueer Characters in YA Books

Queer Anthologies and Nonfiction YA Books

Intersex, Asexual, Aromantic, Demisexual, or Pansexual Characters in YA Books

LGBTQ Characters/Families in Tween Books

 

 

2019 OYAN Raffle

The approach of the 2019 OLA-WLA Conference can only mean one thing… It’s OYAN raffle time!  All the money raised goes to promote young adult library services in the state of Oregon including providing scholarships for professional development for individuals who serve teens in Oregon libraries.

Tickets are $5 for a single entry or $20 for five entries. Buy your tickets today before they sell out! You do not need to be present to win.

Prizes include some old favorites such as two tickets to the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the coveted two night stay at the beautiful Sylvia Beach Hotel. There are some new comers like the party pack at Voicebox Karaoke as well as some truly unique prizes like a handmade silver cuff bracelet from Distaff Jewelry, and an Eleanor and Park gift basket complete with an autographed copy of the book. But one thing remains the same.

 

 

Winter 2019 OYAN Review and More SEL!

OYANReview

The Winter 2019 OYAN Review is now available! It includes great program ideas, the 2019 Mock Printz results, professional learning about leadership, behavior management, and more. Two articles offer good examples of social emotional learning (SEL).

SEL includes establishing and maintaining positive relationships, and feeling empathy for others. Putting devices away, looking into the faces of other people, and trying to read their feelings are important for this aspect of social emotional learning. Read “Teen Poker Games” by Marian Rose, Seaside Public Library, to learn about a program that provides teens this SEL opportunity.

SEL also includes understanding and managing one’s own emotions and making responsible decisions. Providing teens and staff a forum to share their feelings about past conflicts, think about the needs of other kinds of patrons, and brainstorm ideas of what behavior looks like in the library if everyone’s needs are met helps teens develop these SEL skills. Read “Restorative Practices at Hillsboro Public Library” by Emily Smith to learn more about how to turn behavior management into an SEL opportunity—that effectively improves behavior too!

Social Emotional Learning

YALSA

Young Adult Library Services Winter 2019 focuses on social emotional learning (SEL) and has several great articles. If you aren’t as familiar with SEL, “Reading Between the Lines of Social and Emotional Learning,” by Jessica Newman and Deborah Moroney, is the a good place to start (pages 16-21).

“5 Ways to Incorporate SEL at Your Library: Supporting Multi-dimensional Learning,” by Kathleen Houlihan (pages 22-25), provides some practical suggestions–most are free/low-cost and relatively easy to implement. Additionally, two of the five ways to incorporate SEL align with the research on effective communication about teen services discussed on this blog last month.

  1. Describe program outcomes to adults using SEL
    • Adult stakeholders need to understand the value of your program in terms of teen development, including social emotional development.
    • A handy chart connecting library programs to SEL facets is included in the article.
  2. Describe program outcomes to teens using SEL
    • Idea: Create and distribute certificates for teen who complete programs at your library that list the skills they learned.
    • Telling teens explicitly what they learn helps them identify and communicate their strengths and skills.
    • It also “empowers teens to explain the value of their participation in activities to parents who may see it as just something ‘fun’ to do.”
  3. Talk about failure (yours, not theirs)
    • “If you’ve been reading the news lately, you’ll know that youth in the United States have a serious lack of confidence in their abilities.”
    • Teens need adults to talk about their own failures and model failure–what happened when we failed, what did we do about it, how did we feel about it, and what did we learn.
  4. Why you are awesome
    • Give kids specific compliments to help them identify their strengths.
    • No: You’re awesome.
    • Yes: Wow, you’re tenacious! You stuck with the activity, trying several different approaches until you found one that worked.
  5. Create space for teen leaders at your library
    • Teen Library Council
    • Teen volunteer programs

2019 Mock Printz Results

Librarians and teens from across the state gathered last Saturday for another fantastic OYAN Mock Printz Workshop. After hours of polite yet passionate discussion, we settled on a winner. A favorite among teens especially, this book blew us away with its frank and relatable discussion of depression, complicated family dynamics, and the magic of tea.

This year’s winner of the Oregon Mock Printz Award is:

Darius the Great is Not Okay by Adib Khorram

dariusthegreatisnotokay

We also selected some honors:

Dread Nation by Justina Ireland

MunMun by Jesse Andrews

The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

-Written by Lisa Elliott, Tigard Public Library

2019 Mock Printz booktalks were created by David Lev, Lake County Library, and bookmarks were created by Lisa Elliott.

2019MockPrintzBooktalkHandout-DavidLev

2019mockprintzbookmarks-lisaelliott

How to Communicate More Effectively About Teen Development

Busso, D., O’Neil, M., Down, L., & Gibbons, C. (2018). Amplifying positive frames: The shape of organizational discourse on adolescent development. Washington, DC: FrameWorks Institute.

New research from FrameWorks Institute indicates that organizations “working on and communicating about adolescent issues” produce informational materials that “rarely mention adolescent development.” These are missed opportunities to educate the public about teen development, thus perpetuating “unproductive patterns in public thinking” about teens and their behavior.

While there isn’t a lot of research on this topic and this study was fairly small, it still makes me wonder… How effectively are public libraries communicating about teens and the services we provide them?

The following are a few of the recommendations from the article that we may want to consider in library communications about our work with teens:

  • Include a brief explanation about part of the teen development process that is relevant to the library program/service/material you are communicating about
  • Emphasize how teen development, in the context of the library program/service/material, benefits the broader community
  • “Balance discussions between risk and opportunity;” mention both the positive influence of the library program/service/material and how they may reduce harm to some teens
  • “Amplify productive communications pattern;” when you provide information created by other organizations about teens make sure they are following these recommendations

As you think about applying these recommendations, I highly recommend reading pages 23-28 of Amplifying Positive Frames because they provide great examples of better, more effective communications about teen issues. For example:

“Adolescence is a time of significant, at times, rapid change in physical, neurobiological, and psychological development. Many of the changes that take place during this period of life, such as increases in risk-taking behavior or heightened sensitivity to social status and rewards, are adaptive parts of the development process; they are vital for the learning and change that takes place during this time of life. These features of adolescence are not and should not be viewed as inherently problematic.”

Perhaps you want to try a teen program like Will it Waffle, and you anticipate push-back from co-works and patron complaints of rowdy teens. You might consider providing information to co-workers, parents, and patrons  like:

Will it Waffle provides teens an opportunity to take risks and reap the rewards with their peers! Risk taking and socializing are important parts of teen development, vital to learning and becoming self-reliant. The library strives to be a positive influence that supports teens as they develop and become capable adults in our community.

Note: I am not suggesting that your or the library should promote the program to teens in this way!