OYAN Review: Sample Booktalks from The Booktalk Blog: Three middle school OBOB books

This post is an article from the Fall 2016 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It features booktalks written by Anna Monders for her blog.

The cover of Gordon Korman's MastermindsGordon Korman’s Masterminds (2015)

Booktalk
Eli lives in a perfect town: Serenity, New Mexico. Every house has a swimming pool, every kid has a tree house, and there’s no such thing as crime.

Eli has never been out of Serenity before — there’s really no reason to leave — but one day he and a friend go for a bike ride that takes them beyond the town limits. Eli looks back and sees the sign “Welcome to Serenity” behind him. All of a sudden, he feels sick to his stomach and gets a blinding headache. He tries to keep up with his friend, but he can’t. He topples from his bike, afraid he’s dying.

The next moment, a large military-type helicopter thunders in and lands near him. Inside the helicopter is Eli’s dad — and a half-dozen security guys. They load him into the helicopter and inject him with a sedative that knocks him out. That’s the last thing he remembers from that very strange day.

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OYAN Review: Booktalking Resources from Jackson County Library Services

This post is an article from the Fall 2016 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Anna Monders of Jackson County Library Services.

A white woman with long hair stands in front of low bookshelves topped with face-out books. She is holding a book and talking about it to a group of students who are facing away from the camera.A booktalk isn’t a summary of a book or a review of one. I like to think of a booktalk as a teaser. Or better yet, a movie trailer with live-action theatre.

As the booktalk specialist for Jackson County Library Services in Southern Oregon, I present booktalks to 4th-7th grade classes throughout the county. I want the kids in my audience to go home and beg their parents to take them to the library. I want them to say, “There was this lady who came to school today and she talked about all these books and there’s this one I’ve got to read so we need to go to the library RIGHT NOW! … Please?”

Booktalks work. Continue reading