Career Programming

careerprogrammingfortodaysteens

More and more libraries are implementing programs that support teens transitioning from high school to college, careers, and independent living. You have probably heard about or even implemented adulting 101 programs, college test prep classes, and volunteer programs designed more like jobs for which teens have to apply and interview. Have you considered focusing on nontraditional and vocational (trade school) alternatives?

Four year colleges and universities are too expensive for many teens and increasingly competitive to get into. Fewer people are going into trades that require mid-level skills while opportunities in these fields are growing. Many of these careers pay better than those only require a high school diploma, and some of them pay really well.

You can learn more about these trends and relevant library program ideas in Career Programming for Today’s Teens: Exploring Nontraditional and Vocational Alternatives by Amy Wyckoff and Marie Harris. To get you started, I recommend the following online resources:

What is Beaverton City Library doing for teens? By Ian Duncanson

BeavertonCityLibrary

Beaverton City Library is currently looking into the possibility of putting together a spring Teen Job Fair in conjunction with Worksource Oregon and a representative from the Oregon State University Extension Service. We last offered job fairs for teens around 2009 and 2010 and have been eager to bring them back for a number of years. I’m aiming to structure the fair like our big annual Family Resource Fair with potential employers tabling rather than community organizations.

We had a fantastic response when we did this program in the past. We have had requests for this off and on. We have had good luck with other college and job prep events for teens and are hoping for the same with this event.

[Here are some tips for other libraries who want to try a Teen Job Fair]

  1. A community partner (or partners) is essential, especially when it comes to contacting potential employers who might want to table at your event.
  2. Start planning EARLY, 5-6 months in advance and before you do any advertising or announcements.
  3. Create a streamlined application form that potential employers will fill out to apply for a table. This will help make the even seem more official and cement commitments to participate more than simple email or oral community will. I am happy to share a draft of the form we’re using if you would like to adapt it.
  4. Create a small brochure/map of the room for attendees showing them where all of the tables are.

[In the past, attendance has been] pretty good, but we could always do better! As I mentioned before, we have had good luck with college prep and practice tests. All of the summer and spring break programs have our best attendance. During the school year I focus on my Teen Library Council and events with them, two writing contests (we generally get 150-250 entries for these), and our big annual Teen Art Show which draws between 500 and 700.

Getting the word out is always a challenge, as is keeping up with fast-moving trends and devising new programs that will draw a crown. I’m fortunate to be at a library that is so supportive of services for teens!

Written by Ian Duncanson

 

Beaverton City Library’s 2016-2017 statistics from the State Library of Oregon:

  • County: Washington
  • Population: 141,671
  • Registered borrowers: 63,722
  • Total library visits: 821,233
  • Total library hours in a typical week: 63
  • Total paid staff: 68.35

Learn more about Beaverton City Library via their website and facebook page.

Want to share what your library is doing for teens? Contact Katie Anderson.

 

 

YALSA news: funding for middle school college & career prep, YA Services Symposium, grants for computer science programs

YALSA is offering some exciting opportunities (including funding!). See below for details!

The logo of YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services AssociationFunding & CE Opportunity for Rural, Small & Tribal Library Staff
Now through September 1st, small, rural, and tribal library staff can apply to be a part of a cohort of learners and do-ers who will create college and career readiness (CCR) services for the middle schoolers in their community. Successful applicants will receive a wide variety of support, including access to mentors, a stipend to purchase CCR materials, and funds to travel to Denver, CO, from February 8th to 9th for orientation, as well as to another conference of their choice. Cohort members will work online throughout 2018 to develop, implement, and evaluate a CCR service with a partner in their community.

Get New Ideas & Inspirations!
Registration is open for the YA Services Symposium this November 3rd through 5th in Louisville, KY. The theme is “empowering teens to increase your library’s impact.” Anyone interested in attending is welcome to come to this event. Learn more, register, and view the preliminary program!

Give a Little, Get a Lot
Everyone is welcome to join YALSA/ALA, and membership starts at $61 per year and entitles you to all kinds of great benefits, such as free live monthly webinars and a link to the recordings (a $760 value). You’ll also be connected to 4,800+ fabulous library staff across the country who share the same interests and challenges as you! Your dues support YALSA’s advocacy efforts, including our work with ALA and Congressional staff to boost library funding nationwide. Learn more or join. Questions? Contact Letitia Smith at lsmith@ala.org or 312.280.4390. She’s happy to help!

Grants to Support Computer Science Programs
ALA has announced a competitive grant program, sponsored by Google, that will fund a cohort of 25-50 school and public libraries to design computational thinking and computer science programs for and with youth, including underrepresented youth. ALA will award between 25 and 50 grants worth between $5,000 and $25,000 each. Apply now!

Get support for college and career readiness programs

The logo of YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services AssociationYALSA has teamed up with the Association of Rural and Small Libraries to support small, rural, and tribal library staff in developing college and career prep offerings for middle schoolers. They’re now accepting applications for the second cohort of the Future Ready with the Library project, which is funded by IMLS. Thirty participants will be selected, and applications are due by September 1st. Those selected to participate in the second cohort will meet face-to-face for a two day orientation just before the ALA Midwinter meeting in Denver, Colorado.

Want details? Check out the FAQ, the list of libraries in the first cohort, updates about the project on the YALSAblog, and an informational webinar this Thursday at 4pm. We’d love to see an Oregon library in the list for the second cohort!