OYAN Review: A Room of Their Own: Teens Get a New Space at The Dalles-Wasco County Library

This post is an article from the Spring 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Megan A. Hoak of The Dalles-Wasco County Library.

floor plan for a teen space in a public libraryThis summer, The Dalles-Wasco County Library will open a new teen area. This space has been specifically designed for students in 6th-12th grade. The library is utilizing a $40,000 Capacity Grant from Oregon Cultural Trust, in conjunction with matching funds from Google, in order to repurpose a 1,020 square foot section of the library’s second floor.

The library applied for the grant in April of 2016 after seeing an 87% increase in attendance at library programs for middle and high school students. This dramatic increase, along with the desire to help improve local high school graduation rates, served as the inspiration for this project.

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OYAN Review: Awarding Mock Printz!

This post is an article from the Spring 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Ian Duncanson of the Beaverton City Library and Lisa Elliot of the Tigard Public Library.

The cover of the book The Lie Tree by Frances HardingeLisa: On January 21, 35 folks attended the 2017 Mock Printz work shop at the Central Branch of Multnomah Public Library. Meanwhile, 100,000 people descended on downtown Portland for the Women’s March. That’s right, 100,000 demonstrators, 35 workshop attendees, and I still got a parking spot. For next year, we’ll work a little harder to anticipate political upheaval, thus avoiding major advocacy schedule conflicts. For this year, however, I was happy to spend the afternoon in a warm, dry room with 35 librarians and teens in solidarity over our love of good books. Ian, how was your day?

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OYAN Review: Six, Maybe Seven Things I’ve Learned in Almost 6 Months as a Teen Librarian

This post is an article from the Winter 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Rachel Timmons of the Hood River Library.

A cardboard TARDIS with the foot of someone inside visible“I have my cardigan and my sunglasses, so I’m ready for anything!” I said this originally about a day out in San Francisco, but it seems to apply pretty well to being a Teen Librarian. I started as the Teen Services Librarian for the Hood River County Library District in August. There had been a teen services person before me, but I am the first Teen Librarian. While people always talk about jumping right into a new job, for me it was more of a head first dive. When I was hired there was an overnight teen lock-in scheduled and full of participants but otherwise unplanned. I got my desk on Thursday and the lock-in was on Friday. And from that amazing and sleep deprived start, I’ve learned some lessons that they only sort of teach you in school: Continue reading

OYAN Review: 2016 YALSA Symposium In a Former Hometown

This post is an article from the Winter 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Violeta Garza of the Multnomah County Library.

OYAN does not simply support teen services in Oregon, but at times, it reunites members with their Ghosts of Library Past. I finished library school while working at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh in 2008, and thanks to an OYAN scholarship, I was able to attend this year’s YALSA Symposium in Pittsburgh, PA. So basically I met author Jesse Andrews (highlight #3) while learning about teen trends (highlight #2) and also learning from my super talented former library colleagues (highlight #1).

Highlight #1
San Antonio Public Library Teen Services Coordinator Jennifer Velasquez — my boss of yore — blew my mind when she reminded me that children’s services in libraries run 12 years, adult services for decades, but teen services is really only 6 years.No wonder our numbers for teen programs are small! It’s our smallest window. Hang in there, and talk about your success stories within those numbers.

An image of librarian Violeta Garza (shown from the shoulders up) is superimposed on a scene from a Star Wars movie in which Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher are visibleCarnegie Library of Pittsburgh Digital Librarian Corey Wittig spoke of building equity and reaching those teens who are not yet in the library. He did a teen series project where teens built a “Humans of New York”-style blog about Pittsburgh trolley workers. Upon completion after 5 days, teens got a $100 gift certificate. This ensured that teens not only walked away feeling good about the experience, but they also made the connection between learning and making money. Also, teens get badges when learning to use their Makerspace-type equipment in the Labs, such as the music recording booth, the green screen and iPad, and the like. CLP staff get to know the teens first, and then comes the learning and the badge.

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OYAN Review: The Uncertain Future of Douglas County Libraries

This post is an article from the Winter 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Violeta Garza of the Multnomah County Library.

Federal timber payments are drying up in Southern Oregon, and libraries are being hit hard. In 2007, this conflict was brought to national attention when voters in Jackson County failed to pass a funding levy, which resulted in all libraries closing for six months. They were able to provide services to patrons by operating with severely restricted hours under the management of a nonprofit. In 2014, voters approved a library district, and Jackson County was able to resume normal library operations.

Marilyn Woodrich speaks at a kickoff for a campaign aimed at saving the Douglas County Library System in RosebergDouglas County is the now facing this economic crisis. Comprising an area of over 5,000 square miles which span the coast to the Cascades and serving 100,000 people, Douglas County has already made deep cuts in many county services to deal with this loss of revenue, and the library is the newest casualty. The Douglas County Library System is slated to close ten of its eleven branches on April 1st and the main branch in Roseburg on May 30th. Continue reading

OYAN Review: Salem Library’s Teen Book Club named to the YALSA Teens’ Top Ten panel

This post is an article from the Winter 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Sonja Somerville of the Salem Public Library.

The logo for YALSA's Teens' Top Ten listSalem Public Library’s Speak Up! Teen Book Club has been selected for the official Teens’ Top Ten panel for 2017-2018. I’m psyched because it was a bit of a complicated application process and they choose just 20 nationwide.

Teens’ Top Ten is an annual project of the Young Adult Library Services Association, a division of the American Library Association. Announced each October during Teen Read Week, the list recognizes the best young adult books published in the previous year, as nominated and voted on by teens across the county. In 2016, a total of 28,000 teens voted on the 25 nominated books to narrow the list to the official Teens’ Top Ten. As part of the panel, Speak Up! will play a key part in choosing the list of 25 nominees for the next two years.

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OYAN Review: Scholarship Funds, Announcements, Upcoming Meetings

This post contains additional information from the Fall 2016 issue of the OYAN Review. We welcome all your comments, articles, photos, book reviews, ideas, and suggestions for future OYAN Review newsletters! Please submit to oyanpublications@gmail.com.

Scholarship Funds Available
Is there a professional conference that you’ve been dying to go to but the cost is prohibitive? Consider applying for a scholarship from OYAN. Most people use this fund to help defray the cost of ALA or YALSA conferences. But it can be used for any local, state, regional, or national conference.

All you need to do is fill out a short application and write a report within three months of attendance. Just check out the amazing things happening at ALA Midwinter in Atlanta GA. This fund is open to any OYAN member in good standing.

Announcements
The Mock Printz Award Workshop will be Saturday January 21st at the Central branch of the Multnomah County Library and is currently open for registration. Check out our earlier post for details and Goodreads for the reading list.

OYAN Graphic Rave 2016 has been officially announced!

The OYAN Fall workshop, which was held immediately before the fall membership meeting on Friday, October 21st, was titled Outcome-Based Evaluation: Putting Teen Programs on a Level Playing Field with Children’s Programs.

Upcoming Meetings

Can’t make it to meetings in person? You can always join remotely from your desktop, tablet, or smartphone or call in from any telephone! Details will be provided via email or here on the blog before each meeting.