OYAN Review: Aha! Moments

This post is an article from the Spring 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Julie Jenmard at the Cottage Grove Public Library.

I recently had a series of “Aha Moments” in regard to my life as a youth services librarian. It all started during the week of the OLA conference. I knew TLAB had a huge program the following week on Friday: a teen art show. Last year it was highly successful, but I was not yet at the Cottage Grove Public Library for the program. As of the start of the OLA conference, I had two art submissions; last year the two gallery walls were filled. Thus starts my panic. I heard rumors that the teens tend to wait until the last minute to turn in art, which was true as of the deadline; however, one week before the show this fact did not assuage my fear that the art show that teens had worked so hard and long putting together would be a flop. I personally wanted it bigger and better and not to fail under my guidance. So, I made a back up plan that turned out better than expected. I contacted the high school art teacher to see if I could go to her class to procure art. She responded quickly and invited me to all five of her art class periods. Tuesday did bring in about ten art pieces. Even still, those few pieces would not have had the gallery brimming with art.

The day of the visit rolls around, I have a bell schedule in my hand and I venture to the local high school for my first ever class visit as a youth services librarian. Aha moment number one: I am not nervous around a large group of teens. I have never had the opportunity to be around so many teenagers at once. Instead of feeling any ounce of trepidation, I felt my introverted self more energetic around their presence.

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OYAN Review: Better Than a Bio: Meet Greta

This post is an article from the Spring 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog.

OYAN Review – spring 2018

Recently I spoke with Greta Bergquist, Youth Services Consultant at the State Library. Here’s what she had to say for herself.

What’s your deal?

I love kids and libraries. And chocolate and dogs.

Tell me about a book you didn’t finish.

Cinder by Marissa Meyer. I tried to like the Lunar Chronicles because my teens did, but I just couldn’t get into them. A few of my YA favs are Angie Thomas, Nicola Yoon, Jason Reynolds, John Corey Whaley, Deborah Heiligman, Sharon Draper and Sharon Flake. I just started Saints and Misfits by S.K. Ali.

What would I find in your fridge?

Butter, lemons, eggs, spinach. And a door full of condiments.

Are you more a hunter or gatherer?

I’d rather be a gatherer but I think I’m more of a hunter.

In the movie about your life, who would play you and what genre would it be?

A comedy starring Amy Poehler.

OYAN Review: Teen Mystery Program

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Marian Rose at the Seaside Public Library.

I consider myself lucky that my library is right across the street from our district middle school. The teen events are held after school on Tuesdays for one hour (unofficially an hour and a half). Although it’s easy access for teens to attend after school, keeping it interesting and fun (while introducing what the library has to offer) to keep them coming back and wanting more can be a challenge.

When I scheduled a murder mystery in the library I had no idea where to start. Continue reading

OYAN Review: QPR: Question. Persuade. Refer.

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Julie Jeanmard at the Cottage Grove Public Library.

Cindy Womack presented a workshop at the OYAN fall meeting from the QPR Institute about suicide prevention. Suicide is preventable and intervention does help. In fact, survivors of suicide attempts report immediate regret once the action was taken and a want to live. It is often a solution to a perceived problem that stems from pain and hopelessness. Three signs of suicide can be direct or indirect comments, behavioral cues, or situational circumstances. Comments can include “I am going to… (harm myself).” or “I don’t want to be here anymore.” Behavioral cues might be previous attempts, giving away one’s belongings, cleaning out their room/locker, or religious interest gain or loss. Some circumstances that can trigger suicidal thoughts are expulsion from school, loss of a relationship, death of a loved one, financial in- security, fear of punishment (for example, juvenile detention), or rejection from peers/friends.

The first step in prevention is to question the person. Continue reading

OYAN Review: Cat Winters Visits Cedar Mill Library

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Mark Richardson at the Cedar Mill Community Library.

On Novemer 8th, author Cat Winters visited the Cedar Mill Library to discuss The Steep and Thorny Way and her new book, Odd and True. There were nearly thirty teens in attendance, and some of them had read everything she had written. Cat went through her writing process in detail regarding The Steep and Thorny Way, an historical fiction book set in Oregon about a biracial girl investigating her father’s death in the 1920s. She said that the book was inspired by Hamlet.

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Call for Newsletter Articles

Have you pulled off a great program, built an effective partnership, or written a great booktalk? Share your awesomeness with other Oregon library staff working with teens by submitting an article to oyanpublications@gmail.com! The deadline for inclusion in the winter newsletter is Monday, January 15th. The OYAN Review publishes quarterly, so you can always send articles, and they’ll be included in the next newsletter. We can’t wait to hear what you’ve been doing!