OYAN Review: Teen Review: Odd & True

This post is an article from the Fall 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by teen reviewer Emily at the Cedar Mill Community Library.

Note: Author Cat Winters will be visiting the Cedar Mill Library on November 8th to talk about her books with teens and tweens at 3pm.

Fast Facts:
Book: Odd & True by Cat Winters
Published: September 2017
Genre: Fantasy, Historical Fiction
Recommended for: Fans of mystery, adventure, historical fiction, fantasy
Rating: 5/5 stars

Review
Odette has spun mystical, magical tales for her younger sister Trudchen ever since they were little. Now that she’s older, however, Tru is starting to lose the magic from these stories. She’s realizing that they were nothing more than just that, stories. Od was just trying to comfort Tru through the long, worrisome nights and Tru’s constant pain from the effects of “a bout of fevers.” Tru seems destined to a life at home with her aunt, until one night when Od shows back up at her window. Od tells Tru that all those magical stories that they shared long into the night were, in fact, very true. Monsters roam the world and, if the girls aren’t careful, they could be in grave danger. The sisters embark on a magical journey across the United States to find their monster hunting mother at the turn of the 20th Century. Danger and red herrings follow them at every turn as they learn of their true powers and destiny.

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Call for fall newsletter content

From Keli Yeats, Publications Manager:

Between the end of summer reading, the beginning of the school year, the eclipse, and forest fires all over the state, I know that the Fall OYAN newsletter isn’t on anyone’s mind. But I’d like to put it on your mind. With so much going on, we have a lot to share with each other. Let your colleagues know about how you’re dealing with all these happenings in your community and send me a short article to share.

OYAN Review: Are You Ready for Eclipse 2017?

This post is an article from the Summer 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Keli Yeats of the Multnomah County Library.

A photograph of a partial solar eclipseAs you may have heard, “The Great American Eclipse” is coming on Monday, August 21st, and parts of Oregon are on the path of totality (Here’s a list of communities that will be able to see the full eclipse). Other areas should be able to see a partial or near total eclipse.

While you are preparing for traffic and tourists, many of your are planning programs as well. Fortunately there are a lot of resources to help you with your program.

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OYAN Review: My First Author Crush

This post is an article from the Summer 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Julie Jeanmard of the Cottage Grove Public Library.

Author Maggie Stiefvater stands on a stage, pointingAfter attending OLA this year in Salem, I would have to say I have my first author crush. I think anyone who attended Maggie Stiefvater’s event this year would agree with me that she is an excellent orator full of wonderfully hilarious stories and experiences. She regaled us with stories about traveling Europe to discover new scenes in researching her novels. She spoke about her love for cars, including a story about accidentally being responsible for setting John Green on fire while racing him. She also relayed her personal journey towards becoming a published author, starting with a rejection of her early manuscripts from her college’s English department. I loved what she said about planning out books like a road trip. She plans out the major destinations of the book and then might take detours, but she comes back to the original outline and continues down the path of the preplanned story. Her presentations Friday evening and Saturday morning were the highlight of my week in Salem.

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OYAN Review: A Room of Their Own: Teens Get a New Space at The Dalles-Wasco County Library

This post is an article from the Spring 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Megan A. Hoak of The Dalles-Wasco County Library.

floor plan for a teen space in a public libraryThis summer, The Dalles-Wasco County Library will open a new teen area. This space has been specifically designed for students in 6th-12th grade. The library is utilizing a $40,000 Capacity Grant from Oregon Cultural Trust, in conjunction with matching funds from Google, in order to repurpose a 1,020 square foot section of the library’s second floor.

The library applied for the grant in April of 2016 after seeing an 87% increase in attendance at library programs for middle and high school students. This dramatic increase, along with the desire to help improve local high school graduation rates, served as the inspiration for this project.

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OYAN Review: Awarding Mock Printz!

This post is an article from the Spring 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Ian Duncanson of the Beaverton City Library and Lisa Elliot of the Tigard Public Library.

The cover of the book The Lie Tree by Frances HardingeLisa: On January 21, 35 folks attended the 2017 Mock Printz work shop at the Central Branch of Multnomah Public Library. Meanwhile, 100,000 people descended on downtown Portland for the Women’s March. That’s right, 100,000 demonstrators, 35 workshop attendees, and I still got a parking spot. For next year, we’ll work a little harder to anticipate political upheaval, thus avoiding major advocacy schedule conflicts. For this year, however, I was happy to spend the afternoon in a warm, dry room with 35 librarians and teens in solidarity over our love of good books. Ian, how was your day?

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OYAN Review: Six, Maybe Seven Things I’ve Learned in Almost 6 Months as a Teen Librarian

This post is an article from the Winter 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Rachel Timmons of the Hood River Library.

A cardboard TARDIS with the foot of someone inside visible“I have my cardigan and my sunglasses, so I’m ready for anything!” I said this originally about a day out in San Francisco, but it seems to apply pretty well to being a Teen Librarian. I started as the Teen Services Librarian for the Hood River County Library District in August. There had been a teen services person before me, but I am the first Teen Librarian. While people always talk about jumping right into a new job, for me it was more of a head first dive. When I was hired there was an overnight teen lock-in scheduled and full of participants but otherwise unplanned. I got my desk on Thursday and the lock-in was on Friday. And from that amazing and sleep deprived start, I’ve learned some lessons that they only sort of teach you in school: Continue reading