OYAN Review: Teen Mystery Program

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Marian Rose at the Seaside Public Library.

I consider myself lucky that my library is right across the street from our district middle school. The teen events are held after school on Tuesdays for one hour (unofficially an hour and a half). Although it’s easy access for teens to attend after school, keeping it interesting and fun (while introducing what the library has to offer) to keep them coming back and wanting more can be a challenge.

When I scheduled a murder mystery in the library I had no idea where to start. Continue reading

OYAN Review: QPR: Question. Persuade. Refer.

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Julie Jeanmard at the Cottage Grove Public Library.

Cindy Womack presented a workshop at the OYAN fall meeting from the QPR Institute about suicide prevention. Suicide is preventable and intervention does help. In fact, survivors of suicide attempts report immediate regret once the action was taken and a want to live. It is often a solution to a perceived problem that stems from pain and hopelessness. Three signs of suicide can be direct or indirect comments, behavioral cues, or situational circumstances. Comments can include “I am going to… (harm myself).” or “I don’t want to be here anymore.” Behavioral cues might be previous attempts, giving away one’s belongings, cleaning out their room/locker, or religious interest gain or loss. Some circumstances that can trigger suicidal thoughts are expulsion from school, loss of a relationship, death of a loved one, financial in- security, fear of punishment (for example, juvenile detention), or rejection from peers/friends.

The first step in prevention is to question the person. Continue reading

OYAN Review: Cat Winters Visits Cedar Mill Library

This post is an article from the Winter 2018 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Mark Richardson at the Cedar Mill Community Library.

On Novemer 8th, author Cat Winters visited the Cedar Mill Library to discuss The Steep and Thorny Way and her new book, Odd and True. There were nearly thirty teens in attendance, and some of them had read everything she had written. Cat went through her writing process in detail regarding The Steep and Thorny Way, an historical fiction book set in Oregon about a biracial girl investigating her father’s death in the 1920s. She said that the book was inspired by Hamlet.

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Call for Newsletter Articles

Have you pulled off a great program, built an effective partnership, or written a great booktalk? Share your awesomeness with other Oregon library staff working with teens by submitting an article to oyanpublications@gmail.com! The deadline for inclusion in the winter newsletter is Monday, January 15th. The OYAN Review publishes quarterly, so you can always send articles, and they’ll be included in the next newsletter. We can’t wait to hear what you’ve been doing!

OYAN Review: Teen Review: Odd & True

This post is an article from the Fall 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by teen reviewer Emily at the Cedar Mill Community Library.

Note: Author Cat Winters will be visiting the Cedar Mill Library on November 8th to talk about her books with teens and tweens at 3pm.

Fast Facts:
Book: Odd & True by Cat Winters
Published: September 2017
Genre: Fantasy, Historical Fiction
Recommended for: Fans of mystery, adventure, historical fiction, fantasy
Rating: 5/5 stars

Review
Odette has spun mystical, magical tales for her younger sister Trudchen ever since they were little. Now that she’s older, however, Tru is starting to lose the magic from these stories. She’s realizing that they were nothing more than just that, stories. Od was just trying to comfort Tru through the long, worrisome nights and Tru’s constant pain from the effects of “a bout of fevers.” Tru seems destined to a life at home with her aunt, until one night when Od shows back up at her window. Od tells Tru that all those magical stories that they shared long into the night were, in fact, very true. Monsters roam the world and, if the girls aren’t careful, they could be in grave danger. The sisters embark on a magical journey across the United States to find their monster hunting mother at the turn of the 20th Century. Danger and red herrings follow them at every turn as they learn of their true powers and destiny.

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Call for fall newsletter content

From Keli Yeats, Publications Manager:

Between the end of summer reading, the beginning of the school year, the eclipse, and forest fires all over the state, I know that the Fall OYAN newsletter isn’t on anyone’s mind. But I’d like to put it on your mind. With so much going on, we have a lot to share with each other. Let your colleagues know about how you’re dealing with all these happenings in your community and send me a short article to share.

OYAN Review: Are You Ready for Eclipse 2017?

This post is an article from the Summer 2017 issue of the OYAN Review and has been edited slightly for publication on the blog. It was written by Keli Yeats of the Multnomah County Library.

A photograph of a partial solar eclipseAs you may have heard, “The Great American Eclipse” is coming on Monday, August 21st, and parts of Oregon are on the path of totality (Here’s a list of communities that will be able to see the full eclipse). Other areas should be able to see a partial or near total eclipse.

While you are preparing for traffic and tourists, many of your are planning programs as well. Fortunately there are a lot of resources to help you with your program.

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